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20130211
20130219
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
increase our deficit by a single dime. it is not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth. >> the president also appeals to congress to work together on climate change, immigration reform, and particularly on the phony issue of automatic government budget cuts known as sequestration. >> question. when former president clinton took the helm during an economic downturn, he said he had a quote laser-like focus on the economy. how would you describe the focus of president obama's state of the union pat buchanan? >> he did pivot back toward the jobs and the economy but overall this was a very libbal brail speech, something we have all heard before nothing new in it and a dead on aarrival speech. he is not going to get the minimum wage, not going to get the assault weapons ban, not going to get amnesty, not an awful lot of the things he has in there. he is appealing to his base and appealing to what he sees as the majority of the country, which probably does support most of what he said. it was a very political speech but in
, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are calling on the president to name susan crawford as the next chair of the federal communications commission. "prospect" magazine named her one of the "top ten brains of the digital future," and susan crawford served for a time as a special assistant to president obama for science, technology and innovation. right now she teaches communications law at the benjamin cardozo school of law here in new york city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the
austerity is the wrong medicine to take right now. >> you have public governments across europe and the united states sort of pulling out their fiscal supports too soon and that's hurting the middle class. >> reporter: of course conservatives consider bloated public spending a burden that threatens long-run economic growth which would hurt the middle class. and that's part of the problem, there are sharp differences over the best way to generate middle class jobs. and there is also a cultural piece of the puzzle. tucked away in our collective memories is the idea that a middle class job requiring hard work and basic skills can and should support a family for life. >> we came out of world war two with a very, very untouched economy and the rest of the world was in ruins literally. and we benefited enormously from that and people think back to that era and think, gee, we should be able to do that again. >> reporter: but that is less and less likely in a world where global competition and rapidly changing technology are washing away and replacing middle class work. faced with these
the eye. just out of sight is the reality of how we are governed. the house of representatives, where congress gathers to hear the president, used to be known as "the people's house." but money power owns the lease now and runs the joint from hidden back rooms. you're looking at the most expensive congress money can buy. the house races last fall cost over $1 billion. it took more than $700 million to elect just a third of the senate. the two presidential candidates raised more than a billion a piece. the website politico added it all up to find that the total number of dollars spent on the 2012 election exceeded the number of people on this planet -- some seven billion. most of it didn't come from the average joe and jane. 60% of all super pac donations came from just 159 people. and the top 32 super pac donors gave an average of $9.9 million dollars. think how many teachers that much money could hire. we'll never actually know where all of the money comes from. one-third of the billion dollars from outside groups was "dark money," secret funds anonymously funneled through fictional
's calling on congress to pass legislation to give the u.s. government the capacity it needs to secure our networks. the president also issued an executive order, to create cyber security standards for u.s. businesses, and for the government to share more information about threats. but cyber security experts, say while that sounds easy, it's hard to do. >> you can't just inform one party necessarily, you might really have an obligation as a government to inform every player in a sector, and then of course that's a high bar, because you're sharing the information with a lot of people which increases the likelihood that it might get out back into the wrong hands. >> susie: beckstrom says the threat of cyber attack or manipulation to critical infrastructure like the power grid and transportation systems is much worse than most people expect. from the "ramones" to the "clash," still ahead, investing in punk rock history, and the prices might surprise you. after the closing bell on wall street today, record revenues for cisco systems: $12.1 billion. that gave the networking equipment maker earn
. but despite that turnaround, lawmakers still need to make major cutbacks in order to keep government debt in check. >> susie: the group of seven industrialized nations issued a statement today saying that any stimulus programs they undertake are aimed solely at spurring domestic demand and are not an effort to weaken their currencies, but this aggressive monetary policy, and what some call "turning on the printing presses," means currencies get weaker. and while that makes exports cheaper for overseas buyers, not everyone benefits. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: if there was any doubt how interconnected economies around the globe are, you need look no further than what's happening in the currency markets as governments try to spur growth. >> the difficulty of achieving that i think is why you are seeing the issue of currency wars coming up more and more. >> reporter: the g-7, which includes countries like the united states, the united kingdom and germany, issued a statement saying that it wants to jumpstart domestic growth without explicitly targeting a currency exchange rate. curren
or not in the french media? obviously it was a huge deal. >> the french government and were very honest. they said the americans stole the show. in american media, you did not see it much. you saw more about the guests, but in the french media, they talked about the beautiful black models that turned like dancers and complex soldiers across the stage. the reference to them that for years after the show adopted an all black group. how you would see all black models for 10 straight years. tavis: i am not night even asking of this question, and giving that answer you have just offered, but how could a story like this in the fashion world, they convince us of x, y, and z. how did the story stay buried? >> demon and i discovered the story, i thought it was very important. the impact that these women and on what we wearan impac .oday the story rises to the top in certain parts but it never comes full circle with models playing the big roles. tavis: i don't want to make you overtly political, but what does this story say to us, and guide us? tell me what the message here is for the tragedy today? i noted
, so high prices, good times, you still get a government payment didn't make any sense. >> one of the things some farm groups are saying right now times are good for farmers but they won't always be good. so what happens when prices go down? >> well, we absolutely as-- as a nation need to be there for our farmers and ranchers during hard times because we have a stake in having the most stable, affordable food supply in the world. that's why in our farm bill we expand on what's called crop insurance. you have a bad year, you're going to get some help. we also do other things to sport farmers with conservation practices and other things that make sense. research, so critical, giving farmers a tool. so this isn't about walking away from agriculture, it's far from it. >> so with these direct payment cuts it to farmers are accepted and used to avoid the sequester, does that mean that farmers have given at the office and they're to the going to have further budget cuts in other budget deals? >> yes, yeah, one of the things that i have insisted on is that this counts as the full cut f
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)